5 EPA recognized the need to strike a very careful balance. Massive dredging itself could have adverse impacts on river ecology and wildlife and would be disruptive to communities along the river. The resuspension of PCBs during dredging could actually drive up PCB levels in water and fish for a time, and was a concern. Even in light of the potential impacts, EPA believed reducing PCB levels in fish would reduce potential health risks to people who consumed them despite New York State advisories to limit or avoid consumption. EPA’s goal was not mass nor total removal of PCBs, but careful removal of enough PCBs to accelerate the decline in PCB levels in fish with the least damage to the river ecology and disruption to local communities. Bald Eagle in the Upper Hudson near Moreau, NY. Post-dredging PCB levels in water declining at expected rates Pre-Dredging Pre-Dredging Pre-Dredging Post-Dredging Post-Dredging Post-Dredging 60 60 45 12 50 50 40 40 30 30 20 20 10 10 0 0 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Average PCBs (in parts per trillion) Average PCBs (in parts per trillion) Average PCBs (in parts per trillion) Average PCBs (in parts per trillion) Average PCBs (in parts per trillion) FORT EDWARD WATERFORD 32 16 SCHUYLERVILLE 47 19 Pre-Dredging Pre-Dredging Post-Dredging Post-Dredging 21 8 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 ALBANY POUGHKEEPSIE 20 13 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Water data collected from May through December when river flows at Thompson Island in the Upper Hudson River were equal to or below 5,000 cubic feet per second and at Albany during all river flows. Pre-dredging data collected in 2004-2008, and post-dredging data collected in 2016.